myaru: (Default)
I must've last played FE: Fates back in March, because I remember slouching on the couch with my cat and swearing every time the wind chapter (Chapter 24, I think?) kicked my ass. Then bad things happened. I stopped playing. Haven't picked it up since.

(Do not doubt, however, that I would buy this Camilla figure in an instant. Holy shit! Give me a handsome big brother Xander figure and you can just have all my money, manufacturer, whoever you are. Just take it. Take it NOW.)

So maybe I should finish the damn game. I mean, just thinking about Xander motivates me. :P I went through the trouble of buying and downloading Birthright in March, back before 2016 fucked us over, and that's $50 just sitting there on my sim card, waiting to be worth something. Conquest feels so much like an alternate timeline that I'm expecting Birthright to be more fleshed out, buuuut... they could both end up feeling incomplete. Wouldn't surprise me to find out neither game can stand on its own without raising plot/character questions that it can't answer.

Me criticizing someone else's plotting = hilarious, yeah. I know.

Somewhat related, Tellius illustration/guidebooks are now a thing, although it's hard to imagine this fact escaped everyone before I typed today's entry. I snatched the Path of Radiance book up the moment I saw it in Kinokuniya - because I still love Tellius, even though I also hate it so much - and Goddess of Dawn looks like it's going to be released in November.

I swear that date said October 25th last time I looked. Sadface.

Anyway. Uhhh... I started writing the real version of that Genis-kidnapped-by-Cruxis story from way back? I need to bulk up my word count, you see, and whenever I'm stuck on my personal projects, fan fiction makes writing feel easy again. That probably means it's shit, but whatever. Wish fulfillment ftw.
myaru: (Default)
Fire Emblem: Fates has some surprisingly catchy music. I might buy the soundtrack. What I'm really waiting for is an illustration book or companion guide, though. Please do give me lots of Xander artwork. I'll buy it twice.

Not going to comment much on the game right now, though, except to rejoice in all of the cute sibling reunions and supports I'm getting now. :D I've been kind of lazy with supports, and to be honest, the romance bits - at least the interactions the avatar has - feel like a trainwreck. It must be the animation choices they made for the bonding/invite scenes. I get that Fire Emblem is a dating sim now, but let's preserve some dignity, shall we? :/

Can I romance Xander? Why didn't I check?! I'll take a blushing Xander any day.

Yeah, I'm bad at posting. Sorry.

We've been getting a lot of rain this week, which is amazing. It'd be perfect weather if rain didn't mean that our internet service has to crap out at regular intervals.
myaru: (Miang - I want to be myself)
We've been watching The Man in the High Castle all week. Highly recommended. The concept was neat, but what sold me was seeing the intro, since The Sound of Music is a childhood favorite of mine, and their use of Edelweiss made a strong impression on me. The Atlantic produced a short article on that, which is much smarter than my commentary would have been. (I also would've been less optimistic in my reading. :D)

Guess I have to read the book now.

We're convinced there's great potential in a spin-off involving certain shenanigans that star Frank and the antique shop dealer, whose name I've forgotten. I'd watch it.

We'll get back to our Wes Anderson binge while we're waiting.

I've been reading a lot to make up for last year's foot-dragging - currently Murakami's 1Q84, and before that I read both the Hunger Games and the Divergent trilogies, finally, after just about everybody else. Also, history books. And a fucking jury summons! That's good reading, right? I'm just about done typing italic tags, so I'll leave it there.

I set a word count goal for the year. There's an almost zero chance you're going to see anything I'm writing, so I'll spare you. It's a lot less satisfying than producing a story every week, though. Long goals are boring. And there's too much time for me to dwell on negativity.
myaru: (Default)
I'll do Fire Emblem 10, since the Tellius games were like... the pinnacle of my FE obsession, I suppose. Next in line would be FE6.


1. The first character I fell in love with/was drawn to (gameplay/personality, where applicable):
Micaiah. She was competant-- she didn't die all the goddamn time Laura, Jill, Leonardo, EVERYONE ELSE. FFS guys, can you try to survive at least one hit each? That alone will make me like a character at least a little (and hate another one too much), but her conflict, especially in later chapters of the game, was really compelling. Moving on to Elincia in Part 2 was the biggest disappointment of my life, and I was fucking thrilled to go back to Daein and Micaiah and her willingness to commit war crimes in the name of a country and people she loved for some inexplicable reason. It made her interesting.

This might surprise some people. I didn't lose my love for Micaiah until I started liking Sanaki a lot more. It felt a little like I couldn't have both, but that's not why I went that way - just how I see the change in affection now.

And seventeen more... )
myaru: (Avatar: All old people know each other)
Our bathroom flooded for Christmas. How's it going for everyone else? :P

For years I've been looking for a kidlit novel I read when I was younger. It disappeared with a lot of other stuff that I suspect my grandmother packed up and donated to charity without bothering to ask me. She used to do that when I was a kid-- wander around our house while she was babysitting me, gathering things she decided we didn't need anymore, and getting rid of them. My mother hated this with a passion, but I wasn't as aware, I guess?

Anyway, all I could recall of the book was that it involved a mummy, a triangular coin with eyes carved on it, and a statue of Anubis scratching at the protagonist's door, whispering, "Where are my eyes?" It scared the shit out of me! Couldn't sleep without a light on. You'd think these details would be distinctive enough for a Google search, but NOPE. Maybe I sucked at Googling shit, too, but whatever. I found it! The House on Hackman's Hill.

No wonder I couldn't remember the title.

I treated myself to a few hilarious-looking visual novels on Steam, and might even play them. A friend introduced us to Conception II, which looks too funny not to own, but also too awful to go out of my way for, so I'm not sure what to do about it yet. She's got the download version, so borrowing is, alas, out of the question. So I'm thinking I might console myself by playing Hakuouki, but am not sure yet which storyline to follow. Decisions, decisions...

Well, I may change my mind if/when I'm bored, but I probably won't do a year-end/new year post unless there's something one of you is interested in hearing about. At this point, it's all long-term goals about not torturing myself with expectations, and that sort of thing. It's slow going.
myaru: (Dragon Age - Alistair)
Brought to you by the mystery novel formula, although the post isn't about mysteries of that sort.

In the end, I had to give my Tales of Zestiria obsession a little outlet. Not too much, because the last thing I need is an epic on my hands, but something. I found out I'm pretty rusty when it comes to fan fiction. I also noticed a few other things.

1. It took approximately 0.05 seconds for me to slip right back into the Pairing Fanfic Formula.

2. I hit the same story/characterization triggers every other Zestiria author does, though I didn't know that until I looked at the AO3 archive afterward.

3. Gasp, this... is not actually a bad formula.

I also realized that I open original stories differently, but that's another topic. Short stories - at least as I write them - involve more plot, and therefore need more precise openings... not that I always manage to make that happen.

The formula I default into isn't a bad formula by itself. It has setting, buildup, and payoff, which is why it can be satisfying to read; it can, and often does, have some kind of "emotional turn" that makes the scene feel complete-- like something happened. (I don't recall which writer gave me the phrase "emotional turn," but it has served me well every time I've bothered to use the concept while writing.) It just so happens that in pairing fic these elements are focused on cuddling instead of something else. It's actually not a bad basic structure for individual scenes.

I think this would still be true if the content is entirely fluff. You can still have a transformation of mood and/or emotion in the scene, which satisfies the requirement for "change" in fiction, which I know people loooove to argue with. Stories don't necessarily need conflict! Shit doesn't have to change! It can still be interesting! And I guess that's all true in fan fiction, when a reader might want to just wallow in their obsession with Mikleo Sebastian Maglor a character they love, and see some stream-of-consciousness contemplation on a canon event. I don't think that's very interesting, but whatever. Some people do. Point is, it's more interesting if something changes, even if that change means we're just moving from contemplation to happiness, or giddiness to contentedness, or some other minuscule difference. The formula can do that.

Which isn't to say I think I should write it all the time. It IS a formula, and if I write ten things according to this formula, they're all going to sound the same, since those ten things will definitely all be pairing fic. Somehow this doesn't happen if I use it for the basis of my scene structure in a longer story, because there are other things happening (and how exactly is a Sorey/Mikleo makeout session not something happening, I mean really) and the formula becomes a vehicle for other elements of craft.

So yeah. I haven't come up with an excuse for #2 (automatically falling into all the cliches) yet. Give me a few more hours for that one.
myaru: (Default)
"The problem with writing is writing. The discoveries in writing will be made in writing. The solutions to story problems - structural, motivational, existential - will be found in writing. ... Your middle will not arrive through thinking, and while it may arrive in dreaming, dreaming is more likely to produce results if you fall asleep while writing."

The Portable MFA in Creative Writing, p.30

My own creative process drives me crazy. This problem probably isn't unique to me.

For as long as I've been writing, I've been what people call a "pantser" - when I've got an idea for a story, I skip the outlining and development parts and jump right in, figuring that it'll take care of itself. Who needs a plot to start with when it'll just grow out of the process on its own like a slimy, scary-looking mushroom? And I thought that's how it was done. I didn't take writing classes until much later, and it never occurred to me - apparently - to pick up a book on how to write fiction when I was younger.

By 'younger,' I mean seventeen or so, which is when I first attempted to write seriously. Prior to that I had written "novels" and storybooks and stuff, but not with any intent. I did it to get ideas out of my head, or sometimes to entertain my friends. Plot isn't really necessary when you're pandering to your own group and their in-jokes.

But this is still the way I work, and knowing how important plot is, thanks to my overpriced degree and experience (I guess), I keep feeling like I should grow up and start plotting before I write. Have an outline. Actually develop characters before I try to write them! No doubt that would make them slightly more interesting.

Have I tried to do this? Yes.

Has it worked? No.

I understand the concept. I could write an essay on it, or pass a test. I can diagnose the problems in novels, short stories, fan fiction. I can even (apparently) give good advice on improving plot and addressing related problems when I'm asked to give someone a thorough critique on their work. But sit me down with my own outline, which I will have spent quite a bit of time on, by the way, and I think I might be able to follow it for two chapters before I run off the rails and end up somewhere completely different. Part of me feels that sticking to that narrow path will stunt the creative growth of the story, but the real problem seems to come down to characterization. Like: I think Character A will do these things and make these decisions, but after writing her for two chapters I realize she'd rather do something different. I might've spent hours working on her backstory, her details (e.g. profile stuff like who her extended family is, or what her education is), and think I developed her personality, but I always find out I'm wrong.

So the character isn't going to do that in chapter three, and because she doesn't, chapter four is a wash. And we probably can't get to Point C on time; there'll need to be eight extra chapters. Maybe. Who's counting? And I can't say she won't change her mind in chapter five, because I just decided that such-and-such must've happened to her when she was a kid - it sounded good when I wrote it down just now, anyway! - and so Point C might be a no go. Oops.

This is both more fun (because I can do whatever the fuck I want and just have fun with it) and more irritating because it means I'm always going to have to waste a first draft on exploration.

Or it means I don't know what I'm doing.

Or it means I'm doing it wrong. Fuckit, then; who cares.

I like exploration. That's more than half the fun when I write fan fiction, after all. But I've never been comfortable or happy with the idea that I can't get something right on the first draft, so the suspicion that I'm always going to have to "waste" the first one makes me angry. There's no way I can get the first round right, because I don't know what it's going to throw at me, and yet that's the way I feel most comfortable in the development phase... you know, when it's actually going on. After I'm done for the day, though, I sit here and think I shouldn't do it this way. I should know better. Or do it better.

That quote at the top of the entry is something I found recently, which seemed fitting. But what made me think about all of this again - I don't normally dwell on it - was Terry Pratchett. He said two things that hit me as true-- for me.

How do you write stories? You make it up as you go along. This is a terrible thing to have to tell people.


But it's what I call "The Valley Filled with Clouds" technique. You're at the edge of the valley, and there is a church steeple, and there is a tree, and there is a rocky outcrop, but the rest of it is mist. But you know that because they exist, there must be ways of getting from one to the other that you cannot see. And so you start the journey. And when I write, I write a draft entirely for myself, just to walk the valley and find out what the book is going to be all about.

A Slip of the Keyboard, p.58-60

He goes on to compare his style of drafting with what he knows of Larry Niven, who's fond of index cards. He's "sure true writers do not work like this." Me too, except that apparently isn't the case.

So I read this, maybe two months ago, and thought if he could do it, I should give it another try. Try to embrace it. I did just say it was fun, somewhere up there. The process of discovery really can be. And when I try to change it, I clearly meet resistance on the inside, even if I think I'm trying to do the right thing. I tend to abandon stories that I start the other way, with outlines; I never abandon the ones that happen more organically. (Excluding some of the really long ones that I decide aren't working. If we're talking short stories, it's true.)

It's hard to embrace. However, it seems to me that kicking the plot into shape after might work better for me, because there's something to shape, whereas doing it at the beginning means trying to work with very little. And it's no wonder that it's so difficult when I'm trying to build a recognizable house with only a quarter of the materials when, if I wait, the others will show up later.

It might be less profitable to fight the process than it will be to fight the issue with multiple drafts. Which I've made progress on, but I still feel deep down like I shouldn't have to. Acceptance is hard.
myaru: (Default)
Wow, rain. It's coming down hard.


Tales of Zestiria has a decently interesting world. It saw fit to explain very little of that world, unless I missed a ton of skits or scenes. Now, I'm not saying this is a bad thing; it told me what I needed to know, and anyway, a world like this, with so many mysteries, is exactly what I would've loved writing fan fiction for. It leaves room for creative speculation.

One thing I would've liked to see explained further, though, is The Five Lords... )

In Zestiria's defense, I did try to finish the game quickly; I might've missed things. I tried not to, because I like completing things, dammit, but I had limited time. :/ I went for the prize, and didn't take the time to do the thing with Edna's brother, or the crucibles, so I dunno, maybe those explain more? (Although the crucibles looked more like gameplay challenges.)

So whatev. Either these are dumb questions, or the game needs a sequel, so I can buy it.
myaru: (Default)
Usually, when I reach the end of a game - the last dungeon, the boss, whatever - I put it down and stop for months. I have no idea why I do this, but I haven't finished either Dragon Age 3 or Tales of Xillia, and those were... ages ago. Yikes. ToX belongs to someone else, so I should probably get off my ass and finish it.

But anyway, for once I'm all ready to finish a game - Tales of Zestiria - and the game is determined to screw me out of this new resolve. For some godawful reason I cannot activate my mystic artes, and that's kind of important. Cruising the internet showed me that I'm not the only person having this problem, and it also told me there's no real solution, because plenty of other people are "fine" and "have no problem" etc. etc. What bullshit. I'm seriously considering just watching the ending, if I can find a Let's Play, and I'll just deal with the stupid commentary.

I fucking hate commentary when I'm seeing something for the first time. :/

What's infuriating is... spoilers? :P )

Haven't been this annoyed by a game mechanic for a long time. :D

Well, aside from that, the last area is epic as hell. I'm happy with that part of it. And Therapy Cat makes almost everything better!

Hey hey, lucky me! I did find one without commentary!

Now I just have to finish the damn thing myself for the clear data.

The ending gets bonus points (like, 1,000,000++++) for the last little animated bit... )

Now I kind of miss the days when I wrote fan fiction.


... and this is sort of a non-sequitur, but Edna is amazing.
myaru: (Default)
This isn't much of a spoiler, but I'll cut anyway. Mikleo, Sorey, and ~togetherness~. )

The second season of the Black Butler anime might be distorting my perception of this mechanic... somewhat.

Anyway, I've shipped this since the first scene, pretty much, so it's like all my fangirl dreams came true before I knew I had them!

I'm somewhere in the middle of the Marlind storyline, if anybody else is playing. It's about ten hours in, give or take. My play time is inflated by chunks of time that weren't spent playing because I had to leave the computer to spoil my cat. You need to spend at least ten minutes on this kind of thing, or he thinks you're not trying - and then, if he gets super into the attention, you have to spend at least ten MORE minutes admiring how cute he is, all curled up and purring, and nuzzling your hand.

Then maybe - maybe - he won't be insulted when I get up.

Pfft. Cats.
myaru: (Default)
Tales of Zestiria opens like it's the Dorky Adventures of Lloyd and Genis. I like it. :D

Wish I could play more tonight, but I have a killer headache, and I'd rather enjoy the visuals (the beautiful, beautiful visuals~) without getting dizzy... although that's kinda sorta appropriate for Elysia.

The music is fantastic!

This came just in time. It's been one of those bad days: nothing actually went wrong, but I feel horrible anyway. Awesome how that works, isn't it?

Yay Zestria! :D
myaru: (Default)
Oh fuck, it's October.

Not that anything is happening this month-- that I know of. It's just... October already? Shouldn't it still be July?

Since July, I've managed to write one short story per week, for a total of thirteen so far. Some turned out to be scenes, rather than full stories; others are in-between, and I'm not sure what I want to do with them. At least two are keepers, maybe three.

I'll keep doing this as long as it lasts.

I tend not to talk about this because the last thing I need is someone commenting to the effect that "you should be doing this differently. I won't bother to ask what else you're doing, of course, nor will I ask any other pertinent questions, because you're wrong, and if you're not doing it the way I learned to do it, you're going to fail." While nobody has said it quite this way, it all looks the same from my point of view.

Maybe it's an irrational fear. But I don't need or want any writing advice, and people always seem to want to give it anyway. I'm sure they mean well.

Or maybe they don't. Did I mention that I'm paranoid?

Meanwhile, it takes a really long fucking time to reinstall Dragon Age 3. I bet it wouldn't have taken this long on Steam. :D I still need to finish my first game, but I want so badly to start another one up with a female elf so I can romance Solas! He's kinda sorta the only one I'm interested in. Cullen is cool and all, and I guess Dorian is pretty fabulous... but I don't really trust him, see. And then there's the part where I keep accidentally flirting with Josephine.

I'll admit to having a thing for Antivan accents ever since Zevran, but that's it.
myaru: (Dragon Age - Alistair)
If you set a thing on fire once, you're a pyro in the collective memory forever.

I was minding my own business at work one day when I opened the warming oven to retrieve someone's cookie and found a happy little fire dancing on the edge of the parchment paper. Since it's generally good policy not to piss off your entitled customers more than necessary, I grabbed the tongs, retrieved the cookie, and shut the oven. When we opened it again (my shift supervisor was kind of worried when I said shit was on fire) it had gone out.

As it turns out, according to the person in charge at the time, you're supposed to grab a soaking wet cloth - probably from the sanitizer bucket, which seems like a bad idea to me, but WHATEVER - stick your hand into the oven, and smother the fire with the wet towel.

Sticking your hand in the oven sounds perfectly safe. Like a fantastic idea, even! Especially when something is burning.

I have my doubts as to the validity of this approach for the situation above, but a wet towel will probably put the damn fire out, so I'll give it that much credit. And I found out later that this isn't an isolated problem, so the way I see it, put that fire out any way you can do it, and discuss the merits of burning your skin off afterward. Then you can ask yourself why Starbucks hasn't formulated a cookie that won't spontaneously combust.

Fast forward several months. (At least this doesn't happen every one or two, am I right?) I'm pre-heating my oven, which I haven't used since early spring; it beeps to tell me it's ready, I open the door, and-- fire.

First thought: What the fuck, there's nothing in there to burn!

I slam the door shut.

Second thought: Shit, A FIRE. WHAT DO I DO.

Third thought: The internet will know. Ask Google!

Google told me I was right. I tried to be patient while the pretty little flames got smaller, and decided to text "lol, oven fire!" to my husband, because I do like to brighten his day whenever possible.

We went out to dinner that night.


First thing my former coworkers tell the noob baristas when I walk into the store now? "That's Amber. She sets things on fire! :D"

myaru: (VP - Shiho)
Interestingly, in the revised edition of Le Guin's Steering the Craft, she describes my own workshop experiences - all at school - pretty accurately in her section on The Peer Group Workshop. (Capitalization mine-- sorry. :p) My instructors were strict about what should be said, how, when, and by whom, which may seem tyrannical until you imagine trying to control "free discussion" between thirty people. Try getting through three reasonably long stories while everyone is talking over each other, nitpicking punctuation, and talking more about their own work than the piece in question. It's fun, and by 'fun,' I mean 'makes you want to murder everyone in the room.'

But what she says here encapsulates everything I've been saying about critique/beta reading for years:

Criticism tends to focus on what’s wrong. To be useful, negative criticism should indicate the possibility of revision. Tell the writer where you were confused or surprised or annoyed or delighted, which parts you like best. It’s at least as useful to the author to hear what works, what’s right.

Le Guin, Ursula K. (2015-09-01). Steering the Craft: A Twenty-First-Century Guide to Sailing the Sea of Story (Kindle Locations 1689-1691).

Critique is not an excuse to be an asshole. If you're only telling an author what they've done wrong, you're only doing half your job, and therefore doing both the author and the reader a huge disservice.

You'd be surprised how often I still get this 50% job when people read for me. I'm sure they're not doing it on purpose, but they clearly have an erroneous idea of what makes commentary useful. Like, if they don't find at least fifteen things wrong by the time they're halfway through, the author will judge them, or something.


I should write a longer post about this, but I'd only be repeating myself, and... why ask people to take me seriously when they can get it from someone with credibility, instead?
myaru: (Miang - I want to be myself)
Well, it has been a while since my last public post (not that I've been posting tons of locked entries, either), so I figured I should say something. The problem - as usual - is that most of my gaming time goes to Neverwinter or Elder Scrolls Online, and whatever time I don't spend on my job is spent either reading, or writing, or... I guess slacking off, which is the thing I'm best at. Don't want to clean the kitchen counters? Then don't! Tell yourself you'll do it later and watch ten cat videos instead. Once "later" gets here, it'll be too late, and you can do it tomorrow instead!

I used to talk about writing so often because I had fan fiction I could point you to. Without that... trust me, you don't want to see my early original stuff. If I'm having trouble with effective dialogue in an original short story, it's ten times worse because you don't have Naesala to drool over - you can't ignore my flaws. :P Also, I feel it'd be silly to continue the 100 Things series I started when I feel less and less qualified to talk about writing at all. Even my own writing!

That problem could be a post, actually, if I could only find the article I want to reference.

While I could get better at dialogue, my real problem is still effective characterization. I think plotting is right behind that. Even with a template I can't make it work, which inspires a level of sadness that requires too much chocolate and the indulgence of a sudden, violent desire to just go to sleep and forget about it. (Good chocolate is expensive! I don't make that much money.) Who the fuck needs plot, anyway? I'm reading a book right now that has no plot! What it has is cats.

So... what I need in my fiction = more cats.

Problem solved?

I'm seriously tempted to write the dumbest, most self-indulgent Tales of Symphonia AU ever, because Genis and Mithos are still in my head. After that I can write the second-dumbest AU ever, which I hereby dub "Mithos Owns a Goddamn Tesla."

I even have plots worked out. :P
myaru: (Dragon Age - Alistair)
I feel weird and aimless without fan fiction. I haven't done much with it for a few years now, but instead of getting used to that and making it my new default, I just have periodic thoughts like "life would be better with some kind of fandom obsession," or... no, that's about it. Twelve years of doing fandom stuff will have this result, I guess.

Maybe I just haven't found the thing that'll obsess me for the next four years, and I will go back, eventually, though I don't plan on it; there were long stretches of time between Xenogears and Suikoden, and then between Suikoden and Fire Emblem. But... wouldn't it be so nice if the next thing to obsess me happened to be something of my own? I am working on my own projects, after all. (Slowly. Very slowly.) And twelve years ago (coincidence?) I was super obsessed with a project of my very own. It can happen! How, when, or why, though? Those are the questions I haven't answered yet.

What this makes me think about, however, is how I feel about my fan fiction years. Not bad; my fandom days weren't always drama-free, obviously, but I don't regret writing the fan fiction. In fact, I don't even regret writing stupid, repetitive pairing fan fiction, because I enjoyed it! And since the only thing I can count on getting out of fanfic is enjoyment (since money and prestige/a profession are out of the question), I see no reason to regret it. No, not even the heaps of Sephiran/Sanaki drivel I wrote. I enjoyed imagining it. I enjoyed writing it. I don't regret any of it.

So. There's that.

Maybe, after working on the "serious" version of my current story, I should write something stupid with the same characters. Or maybe I'll do that in the middle of the process instead. Everybody needs a break from wearing their Serious Face once in a while.
myaru: (VP - Mystina)
It's really more of a reminder.

Eyeroll-worthy subject line: "His equipment will stay hard for hours."

Taking it to the next level: "My husband Mike stayed hard for five hours with this pill."

Lesson: establishing intimacy by introducing characters by name will encourage a closer connection between your reader and the story whether they want it to or not.

Also, choosing your point of view carefully really helps.

(It's astonishing how much more the second subject line disturbed me. I mean, I'm no stranger to spam flooding my inbox. :P)
myaru: (XG - True Miang)
Seriously, it's annoying. It makes me want to cry. This is the one time I will wholeheartedly approve of vague descriptives like 'dark' or 'pale' for hair, or something, ANYTHING, as long as it isn't "bluenette."

For some reason I didn't encounter this until Fire Emblem fandom-- which is weird, because I've been hanging out in JRPG and anime fandoms for a really long time. I wonder if it's a recent thing, or if I was just lucky, maybe? Although, haha, it probably wouldn't have bothered me ten years ago. In fact, I'm not even sure I can say I wouldn't have jumped on the bandwagon, although I don't think so...

I've been listening to the Valkyrie Profile arranged albums lately (speaking of blue-haired characters), and am suddenly feeling really nostalgic for the original game. Makes me want to play it again. And then I think about those stories I wrote with [profile] mythicbeast, and how much fun those were (...and how easy it would be to file the serial numbers off Clockwork Snare, but that's neither here nor there), and I want to do more of that.

Also, the explosive Hugo Award bullshit convinces me beyond a doubt that just about nobody who reads in-genre will ever like my pretentious original fiction, but I'm okay with that.

Anyway, uh, been doing a lot of freelance work, hence the radio silence. Sorry about that.
myaru: (Twelve Kingdoms - Youko wha?)
Going to try [personal profile] imaginarybeasts again, since they have a theme that's relevant to my interests. Don't know if I'll actually submit, but whatever, it helps to have a deadline once in a while, and I've got plenty of ideas sitting around for this sort of story.


Since the last time I mentioned Dragon Age: Inquisition, I've managed to play about 76 hours and not get very far into the story! It's the shards, man. I spend more time hunting shards down than I do advancing my interests in any given region, although I do eventually get that done too. Wicked Eyes and Wicked Hearts is the most recent story sequence I've finished, and I suppose I've been hunting Samson down too... and otherwise I've been digging aimlessly in the desert for the last twelve hours.

Have I mentioned how sad I am that you can't romance Varric? Because I am. It's not fair.

The only other character I'm really interested in is Solas, and I was dumb enough to not build an elven character (for some reason - what's wrong with me? I always choose elves!), so he's not an option right now.

It's neat that they brought Corypheus back. When I played that DLC for the second game, I didn't expect to see him again.

So, uh... despite having a pretty diverse cast of characters to choose from, I've been using the same team for most of the game: Varric (and I will never, ever remove him from my party, EVER), Cassandra, and Solas. Although lately Vivienne has replaced Solas, and occasionally I use Dorian because he's so fantastic. Sera baffles me. Cole could be interesting, but I don't care enough. Not sure how I feel about Blackwall, but he's got some fun dialogue with Varric.

That ball in Orlais was so much fun. :D Wish I'd finished the blackmail hunt...
myaru: (FMA - paperwork from hell)
And everything I have to say is spoilery, but not very deep.

Onward. )

Eh, seemed like a good enough ending to me. I never finished the manga, and haven't seen the first series, so coming at it fresh, it's a great resolution.


myaru: (Default)

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